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WHAT DOES YOUR EMAIL FONT SAY ABOUT YOU? 

If you were choosing a font to set as your email font, what would you choose?

  • Would you choose a straightforward font like a Courier 

  • or something more curvy like Georgia

  • or something traditional like Times New Roman

  • Would you prefer a font without hooks, like Arial

  • Perhaps you're the type who'd go for ... Comic Sans Serif

Well now that you've made your choice (and if you haven't - then do, just for fun!) then read on to find out what psychologists say that your choice of font says about you!

And by the way ...

this character test is scientifically based - unlike graphology which is said to be bogus by most scientists and by the Victorian police.

To work out this test, psychologists gathered data about the email font-choices of thousands of individuals and simultaneously, they asked the volunteers to take part in more traditional established character tests. By compiling the results they produced a checklist of font-styles and character traits. And, they assure us, they found a reasonably good match.

Ok, ready .... here's what your font says about you ...

Styles with ‘serifs’ (hooks): Times New Roman  you can always be trusted 
Styles without serifs (Sans serif):  Arial you’re the sensible type (read even more boring??)
Curvy fonts:  Georgia you like to keep up with fashion
Old fashioned: Courier be honest- you'd prefer a typewriter!
Fun and irregular:  Comic Sans Serif You like to be the centre of attention

So there you have it! Are you happy with your choice? Well choose carefully, because the moral of this tale is that according to psychologists you're telling your email correspondents much more than you realise about yourself through your choice of a font!

Writer: Berry Billingsley

Thanks to John Ganas, forensic officer with the Victoria Forensic Science Centre for his expertise and input in the development of this article.

A page selected from the ATOM-award-winning site ...

Written and project managed by Berry Billingsley for the Department of Education